Heaving – is that what they call it?

Five crunchy frosts in a row.  On the morning of the first of them I was forced outside to see what I could do to get some hot water out of the frozen (brand new) hot water service, and while out there, went to check out the crystalline flower heads on the miscanthus, and the white caps on the sedum. Continue reading

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The Oasis in Reverse

I was dashing through Melbourne the other day, and hurtled past a high-walled garden over which peeped the Dr. Suessy tops of one of the taller aloes, like Aloe arborescens or Aloe bainesii.  The wall folded at 45 degrees at the corner, allowing for am external planter box with the same planting – tall aloes with a dense underplanting of succulents.  It threw me back into the thinking of my earlier post about about the translation of certain styles, out of their climate of origin.  Continue reading

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No name – yet

It’s funny, that thing when you notice or see something for the first time, and then it pops up everywhere, as if your attention has nourished its multiplication.  Some new model of car comes into your awareness, and you start to play with the idea of buying one, and they’re suddenly everywhere you look.  What is that? Continue reading

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Announcing Anna’s Imminent Arrival

There are few individual plants for which I’d be happy to be part of a greeting party – for which I’d consider it a privilege to line up for the chance to shake their hand as they entered the world of commercial horticulture.

But Helleborus ‘Anna’s Red’ is one of them. Continue reading

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